Focus on Math

Helping children become mathematicians!

Calgary City Teachers’ Convention 2017 Power Up your Problem Solving February 16, 2017

Filed under: General Math,Ideas from Carollee's Workshops — Focus on Math @ 7:59 pm
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screen-shot-2017-02-16-at-7-42-50-pmOne of the best ways to begin improving problem solving in your math class is simply this: Just do it! Of course. you can learn some techniques for making that problem solving time more of a success than it would otherwise be. You can teach students some strategies for thinking, and help them to use mathematical tools (which I think of as anything concrete or pictorial that helps students build conceptual understanding), but ultimately problem solving is a skill that students master by engaging in it regularly.

Linda Gojak, past president of the NCTM, talks about using “rich tasks” in math lessons, and she defines a rich task in this way:

— A situation in which an appropriate path to a solution is not readily apparent
— Can be adapted to maintain high cognitive demand while meeting individual needs
— Requires students to do more than remember a fact or reproduce a skill
— Encourages investigations and deep thinking
— Has multiple entry points, solution paths and at times multiple solutions

I encourage you to look at the tasks you are asking students to do in your lessons and see how they stack up against such a criteria list.

For those attending the session tomorrow, I am not able right now to create a link for downloading the handout, but if you email me (carolleenorris@gmail.com) in the next 10 days I will see that you get a copy of it.

Mathematically yours,

Carollee

 

BCTF New Teachers’ Conf: Seeing Dots February 27, 2016

100 dot array picI am delighted to be here in Richmond, BC, today presenting at the BCTF’s New Teachers’ Conference. I am doing a similar workshop to what I did at the Calgary City Teachers’ Convention two weeks ago, but it is well worth the repeat in this city!

I cannot say enough how important it is for students to be able to visualize and represent numbers in many forms. This tool, the 100-dot array, offers one tool for students to be able to use regularly and thus internalize the number relationships that can be seen when using it.

As before, I am making the handouts available here for downloading:

I will upload the extra large dot sheet (a quarter portion of the regular sized one) which can be made into a poster-sized array once I am home with access to my scanner. Watch for that in the next few days!

Let me know how things go with your students!

Mathematically yours,

Carollee

 

Calgary City Teachers’ Convention: Seeing Dots February 10, 2016

100 dot array picThe 100 Dot Array remains one of my favourite tools for helping students visualize numbers. This session at the CCTC focuses mainly on its use with students in grades 2 and 3, although it can be used at many other grade levels. We will be talking about the best way to introduce the tool to students, showing an early activity to help with general number sense, and using the number in problem solving situations. A variety of problem are included to show its diverse use.

Here are the downloads available from the session:

Please let me know how it goes with using the 100 dot arrays with your students! I love to hear about kids using tools and strategies in math.

Mathematically yours,

Carollee

 

Calgary City Teachers’ Convention: PS

It is my pleasure to present this session “Power Up Your Problem Solving” to the participants of this session.

Regular problem solving is a powerful way to help students develop conceptual understanding in the various strands of mathematics. Since there is a tradition in North America of “teaching by telling” (the “here’s-how-to-do-it-go-practice-50-of-these” method), it may take many weeks to develop a culture of deeper thinking in a classroom. Students need a variety of thinking tools and strategies to work with, as well as skills and practice in talking about math problems, but the time it takes to help students gain these needed things is time well spent. The payoff is huge!

I hope many of you will be encouraged to begin building a regular problem solving program with your students. It works at every grade level!

All the here are the downloads for the problem solving session:

I would love to hear from you how it goes in your classrooms!

Mathematically yours,

Carollee

 

GAD Workshop, Surrey, BC October 23, 2015

learning to speak math picThanks to the teaching staff of GAD Elementary in Surrey, BC, for their warm welcome and heartfelt participation as we delved into problem solving, math tools and strategies, and math processes (especially communication). Changing our teaching practice is not an easy feat, but if we commit to some small changes, practice them regularly, add more changes, practice those regularly, and keep on going in that manner, we can end up making a significant and lasting change that will benefit students greatly.

Remember, “math talk” does not just happen. We have to plan ways to incorporate it into each math lesson. It is a good idea to create math partners so students are responsible to talk to someone about their math thinking. Modeling (letting students hear YOU talk through a demonstration problem) is always a good idea. Responding to students with proper math language/vocabulary (when they have not used such) is helpful. Posting “sentence stems” is a great way to give them an easier start in speaking math. Additionally, try creating a “math words” chart with the students that they can use as an on-going reference in both their speaking and writing (click here to see an example of a “math words” chart.)

As promised, I am adding links from this post to the handouts from today’s session (see bottom of the post) and some that we just talked about.

I would LOVE to hear from any of the GAD staff of how things go in your math lessons in the next weeks. You all listed something that you could begin to do right away in your classrooms, and I hope you will share what you are doing and the effect it is having on the students.

Remember, understanding “lives” in the processes! Reflect on your teaching regularly to see if you are embedding those processes into math classes. It will make a big difference in students’ understanding if they are immersed in the processes!

Mathematically yours,

Carollee

 

Download materials here:

100 dot array (teacher size)

100 dot arrays 4 per page

100 dot arrays 6 per page

100 dot arrays 12 per page

break apart number sheet – 2’s

break apart number sheet – 3’s

problem solving assessment rubric

10 frames (teacher size)

10 frames (student size)

10 frames blank mini’s

 

OLOL Problem Solving Workshp September 2, 2015

Filed under: General Math,Ideas from Carollee's Workshops — Focus on Math @ 10:19 am
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Screen Shot 2015-09-02 at 9.52.23 AMA big thanks to the staff of Our Lady of Lourdes in West Kelowna, BC for the attention, participation, and “buy-in” at the Problem Solving Workshop yesterday. I hope you went away inspired and equipped to do problem solving regularly with your students in this coming school year.

As promised, I am posting links to the items we discussed. Some of those are available elsewhere on the blog (and may have more explanation about using them in lessons) so you may want to use the “search” feature on the right side of the page to find other posts about particular resources. I certainly hope you will let me know how it is going in you classroom. Send me photos of your students’ work, your Tools and Strategies posters, your “sharing pages”. It’s going to be a great year!

Mathematically yours,

Carollee

100 dot array large

100 dot array – 12 per page

100 dot array 6 per page

100 dot array 4 per page

student rubric for PS

ten frames – student

ten frames – teacher

mini blank ten frames

percent circles

 

“Number of the Day” Sheets: Choosing the Number January 5, 2015

Num of Day III eqn picI recently received an email from Stephanie, a grade 2 teacher in Newfoundland, inquiring about choosing the number for the Number of the Day sheets:

“I really love the Number of the Day sheets you have produced and the opportunities for differentiating the instruction. Just wondering how you set this up? Do children do this everyday or on designated days? How do you decide on the number for the day?”

I thought others might be asking this same question, so have decided to post an edited version of my response to Stephanie’s question:

As for setting up the Number of the Day sheets, things are really flexible. There is no one right way — you want what works best for your students and your time constraints. That being said, I have found that if you are able to have the kids do them really regularly (daily if possible) over a good number of weeks, the students are able to really get into the meat of them. By sharing about them after they have worked them, students get to hear what others have tried and will often stretch themselves to try to match what others are doing. They have a chance to really play and explore the number relationships that are brought out in the sheets’ activities.

The number can be picked in a variety of ways — everything from you choosing, a student choosing, drawing a number from a jar or dropping a bean on a 100 chart! Sometime I have chosen specific “repeats” (e.g., every number that week has a 9 in one’s place) sot the kids to see and compare what happens in such cases. What is the same as before? What is different? Or I might pick several numbers within a “decade” (e.g., 33, 37, 31, 35, 38) and again have students compare/contrast over those days.

No matter what number is chosen, one question that is really great to ask is “What do/did you notice?” When that is asked often in the math classroom, students get in the habit of paying attention to details, looking for patterns, making comparisons, and such.

I am happy with random numbers, too, but sometimes choosing numbers with a particular relationship is good so you can really draw out the depth of the relationship.

I hope you will try the Number of the Day sheet(s) with your students. More information about the sheets as well as the downloadable versions, can be found in the links below.

Mathematically yours,

Carollee

Number of the Day Sheets to Download:

Level 1 (English and French)

Level 2  (English and French)

Level 3 (English and French)  (pictured above)