Focus on Math

Helping children become mathematicians!

Calgary City Teachers’ Convention 2017 Power Up your Problem Solving February 16, 2017

Filed under: General Math,Ideas from Carollee's Workshops — Focus on Math @ 7:59 pm
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screen-shot-2017-02-16-at-7-42-50-pmOne of the best ways to begin improving problem solving in your math class is simply this: Just do it! Of course. you can learn some techniques for making that problem solving time more of a success than it would otherwise be. You can teach students some strategies for thinking, and help them to use mathematical tools (which I think of as anything concrete or pictorial that helps students build conceptual understanding), but ultimately problem solving is a skill that students master by engaging in it regularly.

Linda Gojak, past president of the NCTM, talks about using “rich tasks” in math lessons, and she defines a rich task in this way:

— A situation in which an appropriate path to a solution is not readily apparent
— Can be adapted to maintain high cognitive demand while meeting individual needs
— Requires students to do more than remember a fact or reproduce a skill
— Encourages investigations and deep thinking
— Has multiple entry points, solution paths and at times multiple solutions

I encourage you to look at the tasks you are asking students to do in your lessons and see how they stack up against such a criteria list.

For those attending the session tomorrow, I am not able right now to create a link for downloading the handout, but if you email me (carolleenorris@gmail.com) in the next 10 days I will see that you get a copy of it.

Mathematically yours,

Carollee

 

Calgary City Teachers’ Convention 2017 Big Ideas for Little People…

Filed under: General Math — Focus on Math @ 7:39 pm

screen-shot-2017-02-16-at-7-16-25-pmWe will be talking about number relationships at this session of the convention tomorrow. Once early learners know their numbers in order, have one-to-one correspondence for counting, and understand that the last number in the counting sequence names the set they are ready to develop some number relationships that will serve as a basis for understanding number relationships in other kinds of number.

 

Since Dropbox has changed its policies on sharing, I am not able to add a link to download the handout. However, if you email me (carolleenorris@gmail.com) in the next 10 days I will send you the handout.

Mathematically yours,

Carollee