Focus on Math

Helping children become mathematicians!

BCTF New Teachers’ Conf: Seeing Dots February 27, 2016

100 dot array picI am delighted to be here in Richmond, BC, today presenting at the BCTF’s New Teachers’ Conference. I am doing a similar workshop to what I did at the Calgary City Teachers’ Convention two weeks ago, but it is well worth the repeat in this city!

I cannot say enough how important it is for students to be able to visualize and represent numbers in many forms. This tool, the 100-dot array, offers one tool for students to be able to use regularly and thus internalize the number relationships that can be seen when using it.

As before, I am making the handouts available here for downloading:

I will upload the extra large dot sheet (a quarter portion of the regular sized one) which can be made into a poster-sized array once I am home with access to my scanner. Watch for that in the next few days!

Let me know how things go with your students!

Mathematically yours,

Carollee

 

Calgary City Teachers’ Convention: Seeing Dots February 10, 2016

100 dot array picThe 100 Dot Array remains one of my favourite tools for helping students visualize numbers. This session at the CCTC focuses mainly on its use with students in grades 2 and 3, although it can be used at many other grade levels. We will be talking about the best way to introduce the tool to students, showing an early activity to help with general number sense, and using the number in problem solving situations. A variety of problem are included to show its diverse use.

Here are the downloads available from the session:

Please let me know how it goes with using the 100 dot arrays with your students! I love to hear about kids using tools and strategies in math.

Mathematically yours,

Carollee

 

Calgary City Teachers’ Convention: PS

It is my pleasure to present this session “Power Up Your Problem Solving” to the participants of this session.

Regular problem solving is a powerful way to help students develop conceptual understanding in the various strands of mathematics. Since there is a tradition in North America of “teaching by telling” (the “here’s-how-to-do-it-go-practice-50-of-these” method), it may take many weeks to develop a culture of deeper thinking in a classroom. Students need a variety of thinking tools and strategies to work with, as well as skills and practice in talking about math problems, but the time it takes to help students gain these needed things is time well spent. The payoff is huge!

I hope many of you will be encouraged to begin building a regular problem solving program with your students. It works at every grade level!

All the here are the downloads for the problem solving session:

I would love to hear from you how it goes in your classrooms!

Mathematically yours,

Carollee