Focus on Math

Helping children become mathematicians!

Ten Uses for Sticky Notes in Math Class September 9, 2013

Sticky notes title pic Sticky notes (that wonderful — though accidental — invention that 3M first marketed as Post-It Notes©) are a wonderful tool to use in mathematics. I have always found that students enjoy using those little sticky pieces of paper! So here are ten ideas for incorporating them into math lessons:

1) Ordering numbers: Write 4 or 5 different numbers on sticky notes and have students work in pairs to put them in order from least to greatest. This is great practice for multi-digit numbers, for decimals, for fractions, etc.
2) Creating numbers: Write 4 or 5 different digits on sticky notes and have students work to create specific numbers: greatest possible; number closest to a particular given number (whole number or fraction); a number between two given numbers, etc.
3) Using operations: write several digits on sticky notes. Then use them and operations that the students know how to use to make number equations with as many different answers as possible or to get as close as possible to a particular answer.
4) Writing word problems: Give students numbers, operation signs, and possibly other math symbols (such at a percent sign) on sticky notes and have them create a word problem that uses all of the notes.
5) Graphing: Create the axis of a graph on chart paper or the chalkboard. Add your categories (4-6 work well). Give each student a sticky note and have them create a bar graph with then .(I usually have kids make their choice at their seats and write it on their notes so they don’t just add to a single category to make it “win”.) graph pic
6) Scavenger hunt: each student has a sticky note with math geometry word on it. Students must find an example in the room to represent the term and place the sticky note there (e.g., perpendicular lines, acute angle, sphere, etc.).
7) Measuring area: Cover a book or other object with sticky notes and calculate the area using the notes as the unit of measure. A particular book or surface may be covered by notes of one size, then by notes of another size and the area calculations compared.
8) Estimating on a number line: draw a number line on the board with only the endpoints marked (endpoints may vary according to grade: 0-10, 1-100, 0-1, 20-80, 1-1000, etc.). Give each student a number that appears on between the endpoints and have them come and place their number where they think it would go and explain their reasoning for placing it there.
9) Commenting on each other’s work: teach students to peer-evaluate problem solving work. Students can exchange their papers after working on an open-ended problem. The evaluator can make comments and ask questions regarding the strategies, visual representations, etc. by writing their comments on sticky notes.
10) Transformational geometry: Use sticky notes to show transformations, often called “flips”, “slides”, and “turns”. Light coloured sticky notes tend to be translucent. Using a sticky note, student can trace a shape from its original location on a grid and then use the sticky note to show the desired transformation (e.g., down two, left three; 90 degree clockwise rotation; reflection over a particular line).

I hope you try one or more of these in the next weeks. Let me know how it goes!
Mathematically yours,
Carollee

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